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Application

Introduction

At present, the Institute accepts 2 to 3 students every two years. Student recruitment for 2018 is now complete and the next recruitment round will be advertised from September to December 2019 for admission in September 2020

 

Interviews

Candidates must bring a portfolio showing evidence of manual skill and ability. In addition to a panel interview, there will be a short test on their knowledge of the History of Western Art as well as a test involving colour matching and related skills.

Application Procedure

Application is made via the Graduate Admissions Office at the University of Cambridge. In summary, you will need to arrange to provide:

  • a completed application form.
  • 2 academic references.
  • academic transcripts.
  • evidence of your competence in English (only in the case where English is not your native language). 
  • a personal statement explaining your motivation for the Diploma course and details of any employment or other non-academic experience relevant to the field.

Admission Deadline

To be announced in early September 2019.

Please note that many funding deadlines are earlier than the course application deadline.

 

 

 

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