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X-Ray

An X-ray can produce extensive information about the construction of paintings on canvas and on wooden panels. Knowing whether the wooden boards are held together by wooden dowels or metal pins can dictate the course of treatment involved to minimise risks of damage and maximise results. Much can also be learnt about the condition of the piece itself. X-ray can also provide a tantalising window into the picture’s past by revealing the secrets hidden in the layers of paint. Often modifications and later alterations can be seen that are no longer visible to the naked eye. This is equally useful for both conservators and art historians. We use traditional X-ray film, developed and then mosaiced together on-site.

The X-ray above shows the shape of a silver platter and face of a woman, both details that were later painted out. The X-ray absorbent paint in these details, probably lead white, makes these shapes evident in X-ray examination.

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A Brush with Royalty

May 24, 2017

The Hamilton Kerr Institute has just completed the restoration of two portraits attributed to Nicholas Hilliard

HKI wins 2017 Museum and Heritage Award

May 18, 2017

Conservators at the Hamilton Kerr Institute have won the 2017 Museums and Heritage Award for Restoration/Conservation for their Restoration of Sebastiano's Adoration of the Shepherds.

New book on Medieval Screens

Apr 28, 2017

The Art and Science of the Church Screen in Medieval Europe: Making, Meaning, Preserving published

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