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Infrared Reflectography

Examination of paintings by infrared radiation often reveals changes in composition, damages, fillings and retouches. Its most frequent use is in the detection of underdrawing executed with carbon pigments. Thin paint layers, opaque to visible light, are often partially transparent to radiation in the 700 nm to 2,000 nm range. White gesso, and to a lesser extent other light-coloured grounds, reflect infrared rays, but where there is drawing reflectance is reduced. This phenomenon can show the carbon-based under-drawing beneath paint layers. This can be extremely informative about the history and construction of the painting. We have equipment that will capture infrared in the region of 1,000-1,300nm & 1,700-2,000nm. We are currently developing a new infrared mosaicing system and the website will be updated with this information.

 

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A Brush with Royalty

May 24, 2017

The Hamilton Kerr Institute has just completed the restoration of two portraits attributed to Nicholas Hilliard

HKI wins 2017 Museum and Heritage Award

May 18, 2017

Conservators at the Hamilton Kerr Institute have won the 2017 Museums and Heritage Award for Restoration/Conservation for their Restoration of Sebastiano's Adoration of the Shepherds.

New book on Medieval Screens

Apr 28, 2017

The Art and Science of the Church Screen in Medieval Europe: Making, Meaning, Preserving published

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